Birch Bark Bitings

$0.00$65.00

Originally, Birch Bark Bitings were used as stencils and patterns for beadwork and quillwork, now they are considered an art form and are enjoyed for their unique beauty.

It is a traditional Cree art done by carefully separating thin pieces of birch bark, then folding the bark many times. Once the bark is folded the artist places it between her teeth and, viewing the image in her mind, she bites down on the bark, rotating the piece to create the image. Birch bark biting carries many teachings; patience, respect, kindness, creativity, medicine, imagination and sharing. Pat teaches that the bitings are like people, no two are the same and every one of them is special and beautiful in their own way.

Join Halfmoon Woman and discover this ancient art form.

  • Saturday March 28 | 9am to 12pm
  • Sunday March 29 | 9am to 12pm
  • I can afford to pay.
  • I cannot afford this. Please sponsor me.
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Description

 

pat bruderer birch bark bitings workshop, indigenous women's arts conference, pass the feather. aboriginal arts Collective of canada

Pat Bruderer, Halfmoon Woman represents the preservation of one of the rarest and most threatened indigenous art forms in North America. The art form is called Birch Bark Bitings and Pat is one of the few current practitioners of this ancient first nations art. 

She was born and raised in Churchill, Manitoba, Canada and is of Cree ancestry, her mother belongs to the Peter Balantyne Band.  She is the mother of five children, and currently resides near Kelowna, British Columbia. Her interest in art began as a child, when she would watch and assist her mother in the traditional crafts of the Cree. Birch bark biting was one of these traditions that Pat continues to work on today. She believes that it has many teachings; patience, respect, kindness, creativity, medicine, imagination and sharing. She also teaches that the bitings are like people, no two are the same and every one of them is special and beautiful in their own way.

Halfmoon has always been an active community member, teaching art, volunteering, and creating programs to assist first nations communities in Canada. She is self taught in the ancient art of birch bark biting, and was inspired by the work of Angelique Merasty of Flin Flon, Manitoba. 

Halfmoon feels great responsibility as a carrier of this valuable art form, and strives for it’s preservation, and for the teachings that it holds.

Text and images from: https://www.halfmoonwoman.com

 

Indigenous Women's Arts Conference, Pass The Feather, schedule, Aboriginal Arts Collective of Canada

 

Additional information

Workshop Date and Time

Saturday March 28 | 9am to 12pm, Sunday March 29 | 9am to 12pm

Register for this workshop.

I can afford to pay., I cannot afford this. Please sponsor me.